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RibesArticle and photos by Jennifer Jewell

The spring woodland garden has many bright stars in the form of shrubs: ceanothus and mahonia come immediately to mind. But look a little closer and you will see how lovely the ribes are as well this time of year. The native ribes are far more soft-spoken but have equally nice things to say as their brighter companions. Continue Reading »

Summer-dry, drought tolerant, naturalistic, Mediterranean garden with California native Acer circinatum (Vine Maple). Photo by Saxon Holt.

Summer-dry, drought tolerant, naturalistic, Mediterranean garden with California native Acer circinatum (Vine Maple). Photo by Saxon Holt.

By CNPS and Modernize

The unique environment of Southern California, while often a source of great appeal for its residents, poses distinctive challenges for anyone wishing to develop and maintain the aesthetics of their yard. The dry climate, paired with an increasingly limited water supply, means a lush green space is no longer ecologically viable. However, there are many other possibilities for creating a beautiful outdoor space.   The folks at Modernize, a website devoted to home remodeling inspirations, like to view this landscape challenge as an opportunity to create a uniquely Californian place for outdoor living.  Here, they share two approaches to this challenge- xeriscaping and hardscaping- including along the way some of their favorite California native plants for the garden. Continue Reading »

CNPS (1)On September 14, CNPS and partners celebrated the launch of Save Our Water’s “Fix It For Good” public education campaign by breaking ground on the Capitol landscape conversion project with a sheet mulch demonstration on the East Lawn of the Capitol. The event was put on by the California Department of General Services to showcase their commitment to rethinking the landscape on the Capitol grounds by converting lawn and other high water use areas to water-wise landscapes featuring California native plants. The goal of the demonstration is to teach the public about sheet mulching, an environmentally friendly lawn conversion technique that removes your lawn, creates a weed barrier, and fortifies your existing soil all without having to haul material off to the landfill. The demonstration was accompanied by a small water conservation expo where partner organizations hosted educational activities and information booths.

2015-09-14 22.50.15CNPS had a table set up with a beautiful array of native plants, all which were grown by the Sacramento Valley Chapter’s Elderberry Native Plant Nursery, making the table an instant hit by all passersby! People stopped to tell stories about their own landscape projects, asking for tips on gardening with California native plants and local native selections. This was an ideal opportunity to refer them to upcoming CNPS Chapter plant sales. A plethora of resources were distributed to encourage the blooming interest in native plant horticulture and excitement was rallied for the upcoming California native plant gardens.

The launch of the ‘Fix it for Good’ campaign also celebrates CNPS’s partnership with Save Our Water– California’s official statewide water conservation education program. CNPS and Save Our Water are joining forces to teach Californians about the numerous benefits of gardening with California native plants and how they play a critical role in conserving water in the landscape. CNPS developed content for their Gardening with California Native Plants page and wrote a guest blog post on CNPS’s drought resources. This partnership will allow CNPS to reach a wider audience, greatly expanding our outreach efforts on a statewide platform.

CA Hazelnut photo courtesy Keir Morse

CA Hazelnut photo courtesy Keir Morse

If you have a shade garden, the California hazelnut (Corylus cornuta ssp. Californica) is a natural resident. It is widespread in woodland, particularly in moist or shaded canyons. It can be found along the Coastal Ranges in Northern California, the Siskiyous, and Sierras. If you hike this time of year, you may be rewarded with a crop of nuts unless the squirrels have beaten you to them. The name, Corylus, comes from the Greek ‘coys’, meaning helmet, which refers to the sheath around the nut. The hazelnut is in the birch family (betulaceae), related the alder. It is interesting to notice the similarities between them – from the shape of the leaf to the late winter catkins.

The hazelnut is an attractive addition to the woodland garden. It is a large (12’ – 15’), spreading, deciduous shrub with graceful, arching branches. In late winter the catkins appear. Each plant has separate male and female flowers but it is the males that are most conspicuous as they develop into long, golden tassels, followed by the unfurling of soft, velvety leaves. In late summer or early fall, the nuts ripen, much appreciated by squirrels and birds.

The California hazelnut is an adaptable garden plant. It is drought resistant once established but unlike many native plants, it will accept year-round water. It is a plant that will fend for itself, needing only pruning to keep it looking attractive. Some natural companions are sword ferns, bush monkey flower, and Douglas iris.

liliesFall is the right time to prepare your garden for spring!

When is your local chapter hosting a plant sale, presentation, or native gardening workshop? The CNPS Horticulture Events Calendar is searchable by CNPS chapter and type of event, including “Plant Sale” to help you plan for regional CNPS Chapter plant sales. The calendar is frequently updated, so be sure to check back for events in your area, or follow the CNPS Facebook page where we are posting many of these events as well. There’s never been a better time than now to transform your yard into a water-thrifty, habitat-extending, native garden!

CNPS_9x12_garden_sign_Spanish_qty_25_grande

Our fantastic new garden signs have gone bilingual! You now have a choice of English or Spanish when you purchase a CNPS “Native Plants Live Here!” sign for your garden!

ditchyourlawnSponsored by the California Department of Water Resources, CNPS is pleased to announce free residential landscape conversion workshops for homeowners. No experience required! Anyone with an interest in replacing water-thirsty lawns with beautiful native plant landscaping are encouraged to attend. Workshops will be held in Modesto, Chico, Redding, and Sacramento this July and fall, with the first classes in Modesto and Sacramento coming up July 18 and 19th, respectively. For more information, to view the dates, or to register, click here. Classes are limited to 50 attendees, so be sure to sign up in advance.

Southern California homeowners, we haven’t forgotten about you either! A two day “Ditch Your Lawn” workshop will be held October 29-30 in partnership with Southern California Garden Clubs in Encino. There is a fee for this class, but CNPS and SCGC members receive discounted registrations. Click here to learn more about the Encino “Ditch Your Lawn” workshop, or to register today!

 

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