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CNPS is excited to announce a strategic partnership with the Jepson Herbarium at UC Berkeley to cooperatively develop Calscape, re-launching the site to showcase its many great resources. Calscape now includes plant profiles for all recognized native California plant species, approximately 7000 in total.  Nearly every plant includes a detailed geographic distribution map, built using algorithms based on over 2 million GPS specimen records from the California Consortia of Herbaria, along with detailed elevation profiles across each of the 36 Jepson geographic subdivisions. The plant maps are integrated into Google maps so that users simply type in any California address, city, or GPS location to find out which plants would grow naturally in that spot.

calscape screenshot

Screenshot of Calscape

At its core, planting a native plant garden is nature restoration work, reducing water use and helping to reestablish ecological habitats. “We’re pleased to be working with CNPS and Calscape to help facilitate nature restoration at the local level. Small changes have the potential to make a big impact on the landscape and can help combat the effects of global climate change and degradation of natural systems. Through this partnership, we have combined powerful sources of information to develop a user-friendly interface that will inspire more Californians to include native plants in their gardens and make it easy to choose and purchase native plants from local nurseries,” said Staci Markos, Assistant Director at UC Berkeley’s Jepson Herbarium. The partnership will be ongoing, which means Calscape will provide up-to-date and scientifically-accurate information on distributions from now on into the future.

Plant recommendations are ordered by landscaping popularity, and cross-referenced against Calscape’s nursery database.  In depth plant profiles include photos, plant descriptions, moisture, sun and soil requirements, and landscaping tips to help people choose which plants they want and how to grow them.

After users identify their plant selections they can create an account and save the customized plant list for future reference as well as locate the nearest native plant nursery by going to the Calscape nursery page. The nursery page maps the locations of nurseries throughout California that offer native plant inventory, many of which have integrated their current availability into the database allowing users to view plant inventory through a Calscape ‘plant list’.  This feature not only aims to help users source nearby native plant material but promotes nurseries that have a shared mission in making native plants widely available and routinely incorporated.

calscape nursery screenshotCNPS and the Jepson Herbarium at UC Berkeley hope to use this resource to help bring native plants back to the developed part of the state, along with the birds, pollinators, and other wildlife that depend on them.  With the ongoing destruction of habitat, the California drought, and the growing impacts of climate change, it has never been more important to choose native plants for our landscapes. Calscape makes choosing the appropriate native plants for any location easier than ever, giving Californian’s the tools to restore nature one garden at a time. Please help us spread the word!

Bees on Arroyo Lupine

Carpenter bee, bumblebee and Arroyo Lupine (Lupinus succulentus). Photo by Debbie Ballentine.

In celebration of National Pollinator Week (June 20th-26th) the Xerces Society, the largest pollinator conservation organization in the world, brings awareness to the dangers of a commonly used class of insecticide known as neonicotinoids, or neonics. One of the many benefits of gardening with natives is their ability to provide food and habitat for pollinators. However, when treated with neonics, the insecticide is expressed systemically to all parts of the plant, thus turning pollinators’ sources of pollen and nectar into a toxic danger. The Xerces Society explains, “As a gardener, you have a unique opportunity to help protect pollinators by avoiding the use of these insecticides, asking your local nursery or garden center if plants have been treated with neonicotinoids, and encouraging your city or park district to use alternatives to neonicotinoids on plants that are visited by bees or are bee-pollinated.” Jennifer Hopwood and Matthew Shepherd of the Xerces Society explore the effects of neonicotinoids in further detail in the article “Neonicotinoids in Your Garden”: Read More.

Comparison of healthy and unhealthy sticky monkeyflower, courtesy of Suzanne Rooney-Latham, CDFA.

Comparison of healthy and unhealthy sticky monkeflower, courtesy of Suzanne Rooney-Latham, CDFA

May 31, 2016, marked the one-year anniversary of the CNPS Chapter Council’s decision to form an Ad Hoc Committee on Phytophthoras.  This decision was triggered by a request from the Willis Jepson Chapter for CNPS to enact a policy addressing the threat that Phytophthoras and other harmful plant pathogens pose to California native plants.  Since that time the Ad Hoc Committee has completed almost all the tasks necessary to fulfill the intent of the Chapter Council.  The committee’s hard work and steadfast dedication is owed a debt of gratitude for the contributions they have made in just one year’s time.  Their accomplishments were shared with Chapter Council at the June 2016 meeting, focusing on progress made and opportunities for education and assistance on Phytophthora prevention.  Here are some highlights from the committee’s progress report:

  • We collaborated with the U.C. Cooperative Extension’s Working Group on Phytophthoras in Native Habitats to develop Best Management Practices by nurseries and project sponsors to minimize pathogens in native plant nursery stock used in habitat restoration projects;
  • We developed Best Management Practices for clean nursery practices for use by CNPS Chapter Plant Sale Growers to minimize pathogens in CNPS plant sale stock;
  • We conducted two workshops to educate CNPS Chapter Plant Sale Growers on clean nursery practices; and
  • We drafted a CNPS policy on Preventing Infection and Spread of Harmful Pathogens via Native Plan Nursery and Plant Sale Stock, which the Chapter Council adopted last December.

From this point onward, the Ad Hoc Committee will:

  • Educate CNPS Chapter Plant Sale Growers about harmful plant pathogens through our website;
  • Support CNPS Chapters in implementing Best Management Practices that will minimize pathogens in CNPS plant sale stock by offering site visits or consultations by Committee experts; and
  • Collaborate with other organizations on new developments, outreach, research, programs and legislation that support the CNPS plant pathogen policy.

If you want to learn more about how Phythophthoras are affecting native plants you can attend a free symposium session sponsored by the University of California on June 23 at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco (free but registration is required).

If your CNPS Chapter needs assistance to implement Best Management Practices in your nursery, contact Steven Goetz at sgoet@sbcglobal.net.

RibesArticle and photos by Jennifer Jewell

The spring woodland garden has many bright stars in the form of shrubs: ceanothus and mahonia come immediately to mind. But look a little closer and you will see how lovely the ribes are as well this time of year. The native ribes are far more soft-spoken but have equally nice things to say as their brighter companions. Continue Reading »

Summer-dry, drought tolerant, naturalistic, Mediterranean garden with California native Acer circinatum (Vine Maple). Photo by Saxon Holt.

Summer-dry, drought tolerant, naturalistic, Mediterranean garden with California native Acer circinatum (Vine Maple). Photo by Saxon Holt.

By CNPS and Modernize

The unique environment of Southern California, while often a source of great appeal for its residents, poses distinctive challenges for anyone wishing to develop and maintain the aesthetics of their yard. The dry climate, paired with an increasingly limited water supply, means a lush green space is no longer ecologically viable. However, there are many other possibilities for creating a beautiful outdoor space.   The folks at Modernize, a website devoted to home remodeling inspirations, like to view this landscape challenge as an opportunity to create a uniquely Californian place for outdoor living.  Here, they share two approaches to this challenge- xeriscaping and hardscaping- including along the way some of their favorite California native plants for the garden. Continue Reading »

CNPS (1)On September 14, CNPS and partners celebrated the launch of Save Our Water’s “Fix It For Good” public education campaign by breaking ground on the Capitol landscape conversion project with a sheet mulch demonstration on the East Lawn of the Capitol. The event was put on by the California Department of General Services to showcase their commitment to rethinking the landscape on the Capitol grounds by converting lawn and other high water use areas to water-wise landscapes featuring California native plants. The goal of the demonstration is to teach the public about sheet mulching, an environmentally friendly lawn conversion technique that removes your lawn, creates a weed barrier, and fortifies your existing soil all without having to haul material off to the landfill. The demonstration was accompanied by a small water conservation expo where partner organizations hosted educational activities and information booths.

2015-09-14 22.50.15CNPS had a table set up with a beautiful array of native plants, all which were grown by the Sacramento Valley Chapter’s Elderberry Native Plant Nursery, making the table an instant hit by all passersby! People stopped to tell stories about their own landscape projects, asking for tips on gardening with California native plants and local native selections. This was an ideal opportunity to refer them to upcoming CNPS Chapter plant sales. A plethora of resources were distributed to encourage the blooming interest in native plant horticulture and excitement was rallied for the upcoming California native plant gardens.

The launch of the ‘Fix it for Good’ campaign also celebrates CNPS’s partnership with Save Our Water– California’s official statewide water conservation education program. CNPS and Save Our Water are joining forces to teach Californians about the numerous benefits of gardening with California native plants and how they play a critical role in conserving water in the landscape. CNPS developed content for their Gardening with California Native Plants page and wrote a guest blog post on CNPS’s drought resources. This partnership will allow CNPS to reach a wider audience, greatly expanding our outreach efforts on a statewide platform.

CA Hazelnut photo courtesy Keir Morse

CA Hazelnut photo courtesy Keir Morse

If you have a shade garden, the California hazelnut (Corylus cornuta ssp. Californica) is a natural resident. It is widespread in woodland, particularly in moist or shaded canyons. It can be found along the Coastal Ranges in Northern California, the Siskiyous, and Sierras. If you hike this time of year, you may be rewarded with a crop of nuts unless the squirrels have beaten you to them. The name, Corylus, comes from the Greek ‘coys’, meaning helmet, which refers to the sheath around the nut. The hazelnut is in the birch family (betulaceae), related the alder. It is interesting to notice the similarities between them – from the shape of the leaf to the late winter catkins.

The hazelnut is an attractive addition to the woodland garden. It is a large (12’ – 15’), spreading, deciduous shrub with graceful, arching branches. In late winter the catkins appear. Each plant has separate male and female flowers but it is the males that are most conspicuous as they develop into long, golden tassels, followed by the unfurling of soft, velvety leaves. In late summer or early fall, the nuts ripen, much appreciated by squirrels and birds.

The California hazelnut is an adaptable garden plant. It is drought resistant once established but unlike many native plants, it will accept year-round water. It is a plant that will fend for itself, needing only pruning to keep it looking attractive. Some natural companions are sword ferns, bush monkey flower, and Douglas iris.

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