Wildflowers of the Trinity Alps

Wildflowers of the Trinity Alps

Wildflowers Galore! New guide to the Trinity Alps

Wildflowers of the Trinity Alps

Wildflowers of the Trinity Alps ISBN 978-1-941624-11-1

For the last 50 years, Ken DeCamp has been capturing images of wildflowers from around the world. But a personal passion for one California mountain range has captivated him more than any other. His father was a dam builder, working on projects all over the Pacific Northwest and eventually Pakistan and Australia. It was in the late 1950s when they moved to Lewiston, California to work on Trinity Dam. Being lifelong wilderness enthusiasts it was here his family fell in love with the Trinity Alps.

Ken has spent 60+ years exploring the Klamath Mountains but is particularly fond of the Trinity Alps and the Russian Wilderness where he developed a deep love for these wild places. In fact, he loved the area so much that he never left. He retired from the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in 2007 after a 38 year career in Fire, Land Management Planning, and Public Affairs. He still lives in Shasta County.

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Islands of the Californias

Fremontia V.45 N.3 •  November 2017

From the editor

Fremontia V45 N3 is printed in English and Spanish.

After a childhood enchanted with island literature, aptly including Island of the Blue Dolphins, it took nearly 20 years to find myself on a real island. While teaching for the Los Angeles County Outdoor Science School, I ventured to Santa Cruz Island in 1998 with ten other young, eager naturalists. Marooned for the weekend, we gained our first place-based experiences with island biogeography while hiking and kayaking.

On this adventure we witnessed island endemics including island scrub jay (Aphelocoma insularis) and island fox (Urocyon littoralis). Checking these and other species off our life lists, our appreciation for island time deepened over a sunset staring back at the mainland—our love for biogeography was burgeoning.

Around a campfire under the eucalyptus at Scorpion Canyon we pondered speciation events, biogeographic patterns, and the audacity of invasive species. Falling asleep that evening, I contemplated my study of Lord of the Flies in high school and further understood all the mainland offers an island.

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The CNPS North Coast Chapter Research Grant

The North Coast Chapter of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) is offering a research grant (2 awards per year) of up to $1,000 for studies of local, native plants. The grant is available to undergraduate and graduate students at Humboldt State University and College of the Redwoods. Its purpose is to encourage learning about native plants in Humboldt, Trinity, Siskiyou and Del Norte Counties and to support projects that will advance knowledge of them.

To apply for the grant submit the following by March 1, 2018 (two pages please):

  • Title of the project, applicant’s name, address, phone number, email address, and the date submitted.
  • Estimated time frame for project.
  • Description of the project: Outline the purposes, objectives, hypotheses where appropriate, and methods of data collection and analysis. Highlight aspects of the work that you believe are particularly important and creative. How will it advance our knowledge of our local native plants?
  • Description of the final product.
  • Budget: Summarize intended use of funds. Our grant does not approve the outright purchase of capital equipment or high-end items such as computers and software.
  • Academic status (school, graduate student, undergrad)
  • Letter of support from a sponsor, such as an academic supervisor, major professor, professional associate or colleague should accompany your application.
  • Your signature, as the person performing the project and the one responsible for dispersing the funds. All of the information related to your application may be submitted electronically.

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California’s Rarest Conifer?

California’s Rarest Conifer?

CNPS teams with the Klamath National Forest to map yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) in California

CNPS has begun a collaborative mapping and inventorying project for yellow-cedar in California. The species is a CNPS Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants on list 4.3 (limited distribution) in the state, with only a handful of known locations. The majority of the stands are on the Klamath National Forest but a few are also on the Six Rivers. Over the course of summer 2017, Michael Kauffmann and Julie Evens will be visiting a number of these populations and collecting data on stand health, reproduction, and plant associations. The week of July 5-6 we visited the world’s southern-most stand, deep in the Siskiyou Wilderness.

Range of yellow-cedar in California. Map from Conifer Country (Kauffmann 2012).

This project was initiated by Forest Service Region 5 when we were contacted by Brian Buma from University of Alaska. His research is showing that yellow-cedar at the northern extent of its range is in declining health and not reproducing. The baseline data we collect this summer will inform future studies across the range of this species.

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Documenting Natural Phenomena

Kids need nature, and we as parents, educators, and caring adults, need to provide access to it for them. It’s a simple statement, but one that has become harder and harder to achieve in the world of standardized tests, electronics, and organized sports.

To help kids get out and enjoy nature more often, CNPS worked with nature educator John (Jack) Muir Laws a few years ago to publish his nature journaling curriculum. The book guides kids through a combination of art, writing, and science-based activities.

For years, Jack has been developing his curriculum to engage students of all ages in sharpening their observational powers through sketching in the field. He has found that this combination of visual and kinesthetic learning reaches even students who had given up on their artistic abilities long ago.
More recently, the Language Arts component completed the experience. Jack began to work with Emily Breunig, an English and writing instructor, to incorporate exercises such as writing haikus, creating narrative stories, and formulating hypotheses to complement the outdoor observational activities.

This interdisciplinary combination of art, science, writing, and observation exemplifies the California Native Plant Society’s goals in creating educational programs: to engage students of all ages in the incredible natural world of California, to inspire them to keen observations of the wild places in their own backyards, and to foster a desire to protect these unique habitats.

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