Landscape Industry Show tomorrow

LIS CLCAI am speaking at the CLCA Landscape Industry Show tomorrow – the convention is in Ontario on Wendweday and Thursday. My presentation is California Native Plants For A Water-Challenged Future

 

This seminar is about reducing landscape irrigation needs, minimizing chemical use, and gardening for sustainability (building habitat and reducing green waste) are all important trends that benefit from the use of California native plants. This session will explore some of the myths of native plants; will show beautiful, low maintenance examples of native plant gardens in managed landscapes as well as individual residences; and explain the benefits of native plants over the broader Mediterranean or “drought-tolerant” plant selection categories.

Participants will learn about the key California native landscape plants that provide extended bloom, color and reliability; How maintenance strategies in managed landscapes differ from conventional practices; IPM the easy way – using native plants; The key benefits of California native plans over other plant selections, such as Mediterranean and drought-tolerant selections; How native plants are best adapted to exist in difficult soil conditions; Key resources for more information, training, marketing campaigns and partnering opportunities to create a new future; and the new CNPS Certification Program for licensed professionals.

Sherri Osaka has a great event for you:

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Just five more days to register, space is limited and the symposium seating is filling up fast. Please remember that our Santa Clara Valley chapter only holds a symposium every couple of years so don’t miss out. And Sherri Osaka wants to remind us that there will be plants for sale as well!

Are you concerned about our state’s shrinking water supply?  Learn how to conserve irrigation water and create a beautiful landscape at the same time at the Native Horticultural Symposium “Saving Water, Creating Beauty with California Native Plants,” September 20th at Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills.  To register and find out more information, visit www.cnps-scv.org, or call (408) 828-6467.

As the continuing drought shrinks our water supply, people are searching for ways to conserve water. Landscaping with California native plants is a proven technique for creating low-water use landscapes and is especially effective when combined with other water-saving methods.  Learn how at the Native Horticultural Symposium “Saving Water, Creating Beauty with California Native Plants,” September 20th at Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills.  Speakers at this year’s symposium are experts in native plants and water conservation:

  • Barbara Eisenstein, blogger, writer, speaker
  • Robert Kourik, writer, speaker, researcher
  • John Greenlee, grass expert, nurseryman and designer
  • Theresa Lyngso, master gardener and composter
  • John Whittlesey, horticulturalist and author
  • Ken Foster, certified permaculture designer and landscape contractor

The symposium runs from 9 AM – 5 PM, September 20th.  $65 for students, $90 for CNPS members, $100 for the general public. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. To register and find out more information, visit http://www.cnps-scv.org or call (408) 828-6467.

“Mow no Mo'” workshop in Livermore September 6th

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photo courtesy Bringing Back the Natives Garden Tour

Save money, save time, save water!  Lose your lawn, get a garden—and get paid for it, too!  In this hands-on workshop you’ll learn how to remove your lawn, select native plants, and design a water-conserving, pesticide-free garden that attracts wildlife.

Led by Kat Weiss of Kat Weiss Landscape Design, Robyn Navarra from the Zone 7 Water Agency, and Kathy KramerBringing Back the Natives Garden Tour Coordinator

In this hands-on workshop we’ll work at a Livermore home that currently has a lawn, but won’t when we are through with it! If you have them, bring a labeled long-handled shovel and rake, and gardening gloves, as we will be sheet mulching—cutting back turf, shoveling compost, laying cardboard, and spreading woodchips.

Bring a lunch to enjoy as we answer your sheet-mulching questions, provide you with a list of resources, talk about how to select native plants and where to purchase them, and let you know how you can get rebates from your local water district for removing your lawn. You’ll leave this workshop feeling confident that you can sheet-mulch your own lawn away!

What past participants said:

“This was a fabulous workshop and it was so useful to actually take part in the mulching process. There is nothing better than the hands-on experience. Thank you so much, a really enjoyable day.”

“This was great. I have read many articles on sheet mulching, but until you experience the entire process up front and personal, you just don’t get it. Thank you.”

“The process of learning how to sheet mulch was great. We were a bit intimidated by the process but now are confident that we can complete our project and do it well.”

“I enjoyed the low key, casual, up-beat, can do atmosphere. It was wonderful to be among others who are interested in learning and exploring new possibilities. Thank you!”

This workshop was sponsored by the Zone 7 Water Agency

$30 (registration required)
Saturday, September 6, 2014; 10:00 – 3:00, Livermore

Register here.

I’ll be speaking at the Santa Cruz Chapter on Monday

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Courtesy Suzanne Schettler: Mormon Metalmark (Apodemia mormo) on Telegraph Weed (Heterotheca grandiflora)

Linda Brodman has invited me to speak at the Santa Cruz Chapter‘s monthly meeting and I’m really looking forward to it. I’ve got lots of Banana Slugs in the family so: love being near their alma mater. But even better, there are lots of great CNPSers that I can hardly wait to see. And the Arboretum, if I get there early enough.

I’ll be talking about how we are getting our message about native plant gardening out to the wider community: what messages are resonating, what images stick in our collective consciousness. And, of course, I’ll be showing pictures of beautiful gardens. If you are nearby, please stop in.

General Meeting
July 14
Meeting 7:30 pm
UCSC Arboretum Horticulture Building
Santa Cruz

 

 

 

 

Kern and Bristlecone fun

Kern luncheon

The Kern Crew

 

Well, I am not a good photographer…I cut off Dorie’s head and the photo is blurry, but you get what I am after…meeting with chapters. This time it was the Kern chapter. We met in Bakersfield and I and a great time getting to know a few people. I look forward to heading back there next month for a talk.

Then I moved on to the Bristlecone chapter – in Bishop and it was opening day for the anglers, but we still and a nice crowd for their symposium – co-sponsored with Master Gardeners.

This picture is better – it was taken by one of the Master Gardeners. We didn’t manage to get Katie Quinlan in the photo – but you can see we were having fun.

Bristlecone

Bristlecone Symposium Speakers

I’ll get better at the picture taking, but the enthusiasm of the people cannot be improved upon! Knowledge, involvement and commitment. It was a great trip.

 

 

 

 

Bristlecone, here I come!

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Inyo-Mono Master Gardener Program

The Bristlecone Chapter is partnering with the Master Gardeners in Bishop this weekend for a Water Wise Gardening Symposium. I’ll be speaking, along with local experts on irrigation, and other topics.

Katie Quinlan took on the organizing efforts for the chapter and with tight deadlines, we have got the program off and running!

 

 

 

 

 

Garden Native Tour fundraiser

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Hei-ock Kim put on a great event Saturday night – Rick Halsey and Nan Sterman showed off the recent PBS episode about California Chaparral and talked about fire, gardening and the importance of local natives.

We had around 80 people in attendance, including Peder Norby, the San Diego County Planning Commissioner who brought wine from grapes grown in his own garden.

A fun time – the food was good and the site, Agua Hedionda Discovery Center was beautiful and evocative. Thanks to all who made this a successful event.